Ufo: the mysterious Aurora crash

Hands up who has never heard of the alleged Roswell Ufo crash of 1947, in New Mexico, but perhaps not everyone knows that 50 years before there was already a precedent, in Aurora, Texas. Also in this case, just during a wave of UFO sightings occurred in the United States between 1896 and 1897, there was talk of an unidentified flying object, which on April 17, 1897 would have crashed after hitting, around 6 am local time, a windmill on the property of Judge J.S. Proctor.
 
What really happened it is hard to say more than a century later, but it certainly can’t have been a plane, since the Wright bros succeeded in flying their Flyer for the first time only December 17, 1903. According to the Dallas Morning News which in an article signed S.E. Haydon reported two days after the accident, the crash would have killed the pilot, a being “not of this world” who would be buried “with Christian rite” in the near Aurora Cemetery, where there is still a marker placed by the Texas Historical Commission wich recalls the event.
 
 
Subsequent efforts to be able to exhume the body have been in vain, however, for the opposition of the Aurora Cemetery Association so that to date the only evidence, in addition to the article of the Dallas Morning News, remains that of Mary Evans, 15 years old at the time, who at age 91 said she had heard her parents talk about a “small body” which had been found in the wreckage and that, however disfigured in the crash, seemed not being the one of an inhabitant of Earth.
 
 
 
According to what was reported at the time of the Ufo debris would be thrown into a nearby well located below the damaged windmill, except for a few fragments, buried with the alien. More recently, some journalists like Jim Marrs, who has been studying cases of alleged conspiracies and incidents (aliens or not), these fragments (and perhaps the extraterrestrial corpse?) would be picked up years later by government agents.
 
 
According to Barbara Brammer (a historical researcher and former mayor of Aurora) it could instead have been merely a story invented by S.E. Haydon trying to keep alive Aurora in a time when due to the drought, a fire, an outbreak of epidemic fever and the failure to build a railway line, the city was about to die.
 
The theory of the hoax was also supported by Etta Pegues, according to whom S.E.Haydon invents everything, especially since there is no evidence that the judge J.S. Proctor has ever owned a windmill on his property. Even so, at nearly 120 years later, that of Aurora incident remains one of the most plausible, or at least not impossible, cases of “first contact” with a Ufo of which we have news in the United States.

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